Thursday, April 2, 2020

Digitpol Attending The International Monetary Fund and the World Bank Group 2018 Annual Meetings

Digitpol is attending the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank Group 2018 Annual Meetings, which will take place in Bali, Indonesia, from October...

This is not fine

A UN report compiled by a coalition of international climate and policy experts has warned that “rapid, far-reaching and unprecedented changes in all...

ChargePoint is adding 2.5M electric vehicle chargers over the next 7 years – TechCrunch

Electric vehicles still make up just a fraction of the cars, trucks and SUVs on the road today. But that’s changing: The number...

CB Therapeutics’ lab-grown cannabinoids could unlock new medicines and make others affordable – TechCrunch

Marijuana may still be on shaky legal ground, but the therapeutic benefits of the psychoactive molecules — cannabinoids — inside the plant are...

INTERPOL General Assembly – Beijing

Digitpol's CEO Martin Coyne attends INTERPOL General Assembly in China Martin Coyne representing Launch Tech HQ is proud to be an exhibitor at the INTERPOL General...

Stay connected

25,000FansLike
5,444FollowersFollow
1,020SubscribersSubscribe

Latest article

Awesome Resources talks about the future of Cyber Security

“It takes 20 years to build a reputation and a few minutes of cyber-incident...

Petrochemical products offered by NAPAG Trading

In Napag we provide value-added service to our beloved customers by sourcing, supplying as well as marketing petrochemical products in markets where we have...

Silver Leaching: the green fabric byproduct that is killing the seas

Christian Eidem, Chair of Life Materials, welcomed the recent report by the Swedish Water Board: “There is a growing demand for natural fabrics and that demand will continue to grow. But not all natural fabrics are the same.” Anders Finsson, the Senior Environmental Advisor of the Swedish Water & Wastewater Association (Svenskt Vatten), presented their findings at the recent Biocides conference in Vienna. The key finding in the report is that many so called green fabrics use metal, especially silver, to allow them to have less odour and therefore require fewer washes.